Masked Angelfish
  • Masked Angelfish Image 1
  • Masked Angelfish

  • Genicanthus personatus

  • Out of Stock
  •   
  • Tank Size: 150 Gallons
    Tempermant: Semi-aggressive
    Maximum Size: 8"
    Coloration: White, Black
    Diet: Omnivore
    Regions Found: Hawaii, Midway Islands, Eastern Central Pacific Ocean
    Reef Compatible: Yes
    Experience Level: Expert
    Guarantee: DOA Guarantee Only
    Water Conditions: 70-78° F, SG 1.020-1.027, PH 7.9-8.5
    Other Names: Masked Angel
  • Description
  • The Masked Angelfish(Genicanthus personatus) may be the most sought after aquarium fish of all time. This fish is the ultimate holy grail. Hailing from the deeps of Hawaii, Genicanthus personatus is a must have for any serious fish collector. This fish has rarely ever been seen in the wild, but has started to trickle into the market due to the captive breeding efforts done with it.

    The Masked Angelfish, as a juvenile, starts out as a pure white fish, with a black “mask” over its face and eyes, extending to its gills. Once one of the fish starts to turn male, a pale orange will begin to take over the “mask” on its face, and its fins will turn a brilliant orange, and its tail will turn black. The female coloration however, stays roughly the same as the juvenile. It keeps the black “mask” and white body, but its tail also turns black and the pelvic and pectoral fins turn a light orange.

    Genicanthus Personatus maxes out just around 8.5”, but it is recommended to keep them in tanks no smaller than 180 gallons, as they are extremely active and beautiful fish. However, when still juvenile, tanks as small as 90 gallons will suffice. Genicanthus personatus is also part of the Genicanthus genus, which means they are reef safe, and will not attack any of your beloved reef tank inhabitants. These fish do live at extremely deep depths in the wild, however they are now almost fully captive bred, and acclimated to normal reef conditions and lighting. Here at Among The Reef, we’ve found that feeding pellets and any food with white fish in them, tends to cause these fish to bloat. Feeding these amazing animals different types of frozen shrimp and nori will be good practice, and will lead to a long and healthy life.

    Here at Among The Reef, we’ve found that feeding pellets and any food with white fish in them, tends to cause these fish to bloat. Feeding these amazing animals different types of frozen shrimp and nori will be good practice, and will lead to a long and healthy life. If you have any questions about the Masked Angelfish, or how it would fare in your tank, please don’t hesitate to contact the team here at Among The Reef.
 
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